Chronos or Kairos Time?

It’s not even 2019 and my new, light blue, unsmudged personal calendar already has several squares filled in! Events and circumstances of 2018 necessitated radical changes in my life’s activities—lots of slowing down to accommodate those changes—but it’s so easy to slip back into what I call “customs of the past.” I see needs of others and mistakenly believe that I’m the only Superwoman who can possibly fill those needs. I want to read more and better books—a worthy ambition but dwindling energy prohibits too many of the  former late-night reading hours. And is it really necessary to run down to the nearby Safeway for just two items or can I find substitutes in the cupboard?

None of us knows how the calendar squares of 2019 will be filled. Oh yes, the dental appointment is sure and—and although my husband still can’t quite comprehend why I make a haircut appointment six weeks ahead (my stylist is popular and she and the dentist hold equal billing)—there they are on the January calendar. July conference dates are inscribed and family birthday and anniversary dates are circled.

My pastor/friend Katie has been talking a lot lately about the difference between the Greek words chronos time (she calls it tick tock time!) and kairos time. Filling calendar squares—making and keeping appointments, celebrating birthdays and anniversaries—are emblems of the former and we often think the most important. It is chronological or sequential time.

A dictionary definition of kairos, on the other head, defines it as the right, critical or opportune moment, a proper or opportune time for action. On Mike Phay’s blog, he describes Kairos time this way: The idea of kairos time, in the Bible, carries with it an idea of divine appointment: that God is in control of time itself, and he has appointed times, seasons, and dates to fulfill his own purposes. Each moment is, therefore, pregnant with purpose above and beyond our own understanding. (Underlining my own emphasis.)

In the Bible we have a poignant and important description of a Jesus follower actually listening to Jesus in a world-changing kairos moment. The baby Church was growing with strong preaching, miracle healings, and exorcisms. Persecution also was increasing but it not only didn’t prevent the growth but invigorated and propelled it. In the midst of rich blessing and fruitful ministry, God took charge of the church calendar! Phay describes God’s message via an angel to Philip this way: “God is doing some amazing work through you … therefore, leave right away, go out to the middle of the desert, and hang out in the wilderness.” Leave the important sermons and divine expressions and go to the wilderness? The wilderness! God has kairos events even in the wilderness?

Phillip didn’t know it but what happened in the wilderness would be “pregnant with purpose beyond (his) own understanding.” . The prepared heart of a high court official would respond with a firm assent to the Good News of Jesus and who knows how his testimony would influence the entire country of Ethiopia?

Katie reminds me (she speaks to a group but Ithe one most needing the message) that God breaks into our chronos times with his kairos methods. I often miss his whisperings because I’m too busy, too preoccupied with those calendar squares. (May I need an angel!!) Or maybe I’m wandering in a current wilderness? But equally as often I’m not even looking for him, not expecting him to speak. When the Bible says we are to “fix our eyes on Jesus,” maybe the process includes an almost hourly request: “Are you saying anything, God? I’m here. ‘Speak Lord, your servant is listening.’” How often does the clock and calendar prevent such listening?

It’s time to take another look at my new, blue 2019 calendar…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“But how do you, Heavenly Father, want on my calendar?”

 

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